Dead dogs, praying mantis and the mirage in the sky

I thought the doggie was just having a kip, when my walking partner pointed out the flies buzzing around it’s head. Apparently fido had chewed his last bone and had gone to the big kennel in the sky. The destination of our walk was to be the quarry we saw on the side of the hill. This quarry could be seen from almost anywhere in Eumseong, but for us, it was unattainable. A mere mirage between the horizon and the sky.

Still who wants to climb a quarry when you could potentially walk through someones pumpkin patch, eat oranges and walk up and down hills through acres and acres of fruit orchards?

At one point we observed two dueling praying mantis, locked in a Mexican stand-off. They were spotted in time before one of us stood on one or both of them, leading to a squishy, crunching end to the duel. Normally, the loser in these sort of battles got their head bitten off. Life and dead in the void, my name for Eumseong.

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17 Responses

  1. I find this photo distressing.

  2. Can’t help wondering if the bowls to the left contain his last, and perhaps terminally-responsible meal.

  3. Every picture tells a thousand words. As to the story of our deceased K9 friend leaves to be determined.

    The state of Korean farms, probably leaves a lot to be desired. I’m not sure if the dogs last rites were administered, but may he be happy whereever his spirit maybe.

    The bowls, quite possibly contained his meal. Whether or not his last meal(or even that he has bad breath and has not kicked off to doggy heaven) remains to be seen.

    Stop press: Closer examination of the photo shows that sadly, the dog has passed on.

  4. I’m sure by now the owner of the dead doggie is making a stew of his beloved K9.

  5. As I remember the joke from George Smillovich, the Australian comedian, “My dog eats his pal”

  6. The dog breeds favoured as pets here aren’t the same as the breeds used for consumption. You can see them here: http://cafe.naver.com/noorungyi

  7. Hmm. Not so much size, but type of breed. I thought they chose a large type dog for more meat.

  8. If it were a staple, I bet that would have been the case. But it’s not consumed anywhere near to the same degree as pork, beef and chicken, for which size is indeed everything. Plus today, it’s starting to go out of fashion just as lamb did 100 years ago.

  9. Oh for some lamb. And an oven to cook it in.

  10. Your stove-top oven could handle a rack of lamb like the kind I once bought at Haddon House. And you can always get Jiang to order it online, like from here: http://gen.gmarket.co.kr/challenge/neo_goods/goods.asp?goodscode=132652000&pos_shop_cd=SH&pos_class_cd=111111111&pos_class_kind=T&search_keyword=%BE%E7%B0%ED%B1%E2

    Actually, the stuff in that link could be pan-fried.

    • Nothing in the way of legs or a flank (rack) there. I think chops would be the best choice given the line-up on display.

      The trouble is that if I’m going to cook this lot, then I’ll need rosemary to season and cook it with. Roast spuds, veges and mint jelly. Sounds like Christmas lunch. Yum.

    • You surf with the best of them, Ben.

      Perhaps one optional thing might be a plum pudding (though I know in Korea that is stretching it mighty too far), or perhaps a thoraxic surgeon to unclog the arteries afterwards.

  11. Yeah, I can’t work miracles I’m afraid. The closest thing I ever saw were mini Christmas puddings at Hannam Supermarket 5 years ago and they’ve never reappeared since. You can get most of the ingredients to make one here, though not sultanas which for me is a big thing in your standard Christmas pudding. Yeon-mi suggested I try making (drying) my own. I asked, given where I live, where the hell I was supposed to do it.

  12. I think it’s a distressing photo and illogical on my part but… a big dog expiring. Someone dumped a big dog that wandered in to my home’s front porch in Sydney. Obviously dying. The owner should have done what was necessary beforehand.
    Korea, big dogs, Sunchang saw one dumped dead outside the elementary school. Koreans move quickly at least when you say something.

  13. It was the natural response of revulsion. Things are a little bit cruder here than in Western countries. Farms especially.

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