Rhubarb, rhubarb

Test scores and a rock-hard seat.

I’m required to give oral tests to my High school students twice a year. The tests are based on material that I’ve taught in my classes. These are received by my students (approximately 40 per class) with levels of indifference to absolute engagement. In light of keeping the students ‘clued in’, I’ve got to have my lesson plans together. I typically use the PPPP schema with good effect. The recent TESOL course I’d taken at SMU had come to be very useful. So many changes for my teaching, being an ELT means you are constantly learning and changing.

But in looking at the oral tests, I knew I had to plan ahead. With regards to priming the students, this, as I’ve found out, should have been done at the beginning of their year. Give the students a big carrot to chase, with a little bit of stick. Having read When? How? Why? by the Saskatchewan professional development unit, I have in, retrospect, learnt how to test properly. But the overall philosophy to the testing is that do they understand the concept? Are they able to compose an answer or question given that they know the concept of the grammar point. It’s one thing to memorise, but it’s another thing to create your own answer. No conversation in English (or any language) stands on it’s own and can be seen as being entirely unique. As I’ve noticed in going from class to class during testing, the students’ answers get better, as they’ve had a preview from other classmates in other classes about the questions. Their answers become more and more ‘canned’.

That is why I’ve only given them what the type of question they’ll get (Past experiences with Have you ever). I have never told them the precise question, then it becomes a matter of memorisation, which, in my opinion is too much like their education system of verbatim regurgitation. As the title of my blog suggests, it’s just repeated words to give the impression of noise. Rhubarb, rhubarb!

A word about classroom furniture: having sat in their class and their chairs for about 40 minutes, the height of the chairs is too low. These students are about my height and are growing lads. After about 40 minutes, the wooden seat pan had left my seat, numbed and sore. I really don’t know how they do it for an hour.

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6 Responses

  1. Looking at the photo…
    “Be upstanding for Baron Chuah, Master of the Rolls.” :-)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_of_the_Rolls

    • I bet Thomas Cromwell never had a rock hard butt at the end of his hearings.

      Then again, I disdain doing that amount of talking.

  2. At least you’re not Judge Jeffries (Wales most infamous judge!) with the high schoolers. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Jeffreys,_1st_Baron_Jeffreys

    Despatch them quick after the Monmouth Rebellion was his jurisprudence style.

    M.R…did it in Fuzhou!

  3. M.R. Master of the Rolls I mean, (not Monmouth Rebellion, tho some of the insurgent moppets 0-( )
    What are these matrices used for marking the rolls?

    • The yellow folder contains the roll for my classes on which I have joted down the raw score for their test and the subsequent grade.

  4. […] in advance, was so that they could learn the form. What got in response from the students was a canned answer. Some of the students, but the others didn’t fair any better in terms of understanding the […]

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